Questions Remain Unanswered on A82 Infrastructure Improvements

Road safety campaigner MSP David Stewart (pictured) has expressed disappointment that the Scottish Government does not seem to know which sections of the A82 have benefited from roadworks over the past five years.

The revelation came to light after Mr Stewart tabled a question following the death of a family-of-four who lost their lives in a crash on the notorious road.

The response received says an average of £11.8 million was spent on improvements each year – but the government is “unable to break down this investment by location”.

The question was lodged after the Cousins family lost their lives on the road on February 20.

Mother Gemma Cousin, 26, was driving a green Mini Cooper when it crashed with a red Ford Fiesta by Hillfarm, Torlundy, near Fort William.

Her husband Rhys, aged 25, was also killed along with their two daughters Peyton, three, and Heidi, one.

Mr Stewart said:

“The A82 has a history of tragic road deaths and serious injuries and lack of investment is causing unimaginable suffering for families like the Cousins and the Davidsons.

“That’s why I tabled a question to Michael Matheson, the Cabinet Secretary for Transport, Infrastructure and Connectivity Parliament, asking what improvements and investment has been given to the A82, and in which locations, since 2016.

“I was stunned to receive this completely inadequate response.

“It seems bizarre that the government doesn’t know where it carried out infrastructure improvements along the route.

“I am lodging a Freedom of Information request to try to get those details.

“I realise that the current priority for our government is tackling the coronavirus but it will be in everyone’s interests to get this information.

“Just to clarify, there have been a number of accidents and incidents on the A82 and it is hard to know, unless there have been fatal accident inquiries or court cases, what the actual causes have been. 

“Many could be down to driver error or road conditions or weather conditions but it is well known locally that the road does need major improvement which, I argue, would in turn make it safer.”