Life Expectancy Continues to Stall

Life expectancy growth continues to stall in Scotland, with the average life expectancy at birth for males at 77.1 years and 81.1 years for females, according to statistics published by National Records of Scotland.

Figures for 2017-2019, show that deprivation has an impact on life expectancy, with females living in the least deprived areas are likely to live ten years longer than those living in the most deprived areas.

Males living in the least deprived areas are likely to live 13 years longer than those living in the most deprived areas.

Scotland continues to have the lowest life expectancy at birth of all UK countries.

Life expectancy at birth in the UK was 79.4 years for males and 83.1 years for females in 2017-2019.

Life expectancy also varies by rurality across Scotland with people living in more rural areas generally living longer than those in more urban areas.

Julie Ramsay, Head of Vital Events Statistics at NRS, said:

“The rate of life expectancy growth has stalled over the last few years in Scotland and this has been broadly reflective of the picture throughout the country.

“Life expectancy varies considerably across Scotland, for example, life expectancy for both males and females is at its lowest in Glasgow City, where males are expected to live to 73.6 years and females to 78.5.

“Life expectancy for females is highest in East Renfrewshire at 84.0 years and male life expectancy was highest in East Dunbartonshire at 80.5 years.”